Can Regional-Scale Governance and Planning Support Transformative Adaptation? A Study of Two Places

2019-12-20

CNDS fellow Mikael Granberg together with his international colleagues examine more closely the idea that climate change adaptation is best leveraged at the local scale is a well- institutionalized script in both research and formal governance. sustainability-logo

This idea is based on  the argument that the local scale is where climate change impacts are “felt” and experienced. However, sustainable and just climate futures require transformations in systems, norms, and cultures that underpin and reinforce our unsustainable practices and development pathways, not just “local” action. Governance interventions are needed to catalyse such shifts, connecting multilevel and multiscale boundaries of knowledge, values, levels and organizational remits. The authors critically reflect on current adaptation governance processes in Victoria, Australia and the Gothenburg region, Sweden to explore whether regional-scale governance can provide just as important leverage for adaptation as local governance, by identifying and addressing intersecting gaps and challenges in adaptation at local levels. The authors suggest that regional-scale adaptation offers possibilities for transformative change because they can identify, connect, and amplify small-scale (local) wins and utilize this collective body of knowledge to challenge and advocate for unblocking stagnated, institutionalized policies and practices, and support transformative change.

Mikael Granberg, Karyn Bosomworth, Susie Moloney, Ann-Catrin Kristianssen, and Hartmut Fünfgeld (2019) "Can Regional-Scale Governance and Planning Support Transformative Adaptation? A Study of Two Places.Sustainability, December.